I Have a Zero Credit Score, What Should I Do?

If you have no recent credit history or have recently relocated from overseas, there is a chance you could have a zero credit score or no credit score at all. You may have also have been the victim of fraud which could negatively affect a credit report and credit score even if you have done nothing wrong. There are ways to get this fixed, and you should contact the relevant credit bureaus (Centrix, Dun & Bradstreet and Equifax) as soon as possible. Either way, both situations will reduce your chance of successfully applying for a personal loan or other credit products.

Can I improve my credit score?

You can quickly improve your credit score by starting a payment history for everyday expenses such as electricity and gas bills as well as phone accounts. You can also make payments on a car or vehicle loan.

How do I get my credit score reassessed?

When you’ve suddenly hit a zero credit score, you should consider looking at a credit history report from Centrix, Dun & Bradstreet and Equifax. You can access those reports from this link. If you notice inaccuracies or feel as if your credit history is not being reported accurately you can get your credit record corrected today.

Privacy.org.nz reports the following reasons for credit report inaccuracies:

  • Mixing up information about you and someone else.
  • A credit provider wrongly listing a debt that you dispute.
  • Delayed updating of records of facts that have changed.
  • Human error such as data entry mistakes.
  • Fraud by someone impersonating you.

Can I still apply for a loan with a zero credit score?

When applying for a personal loan or other credit product, there are many factors that are assessed. If you have a zero credit score there is a strong likelihood that a bank or lender will look at other aspects of your financial situation such as your income, assets, stability and bank statements.


If you have recently relocated to New Zealand from another country, it may very well be the case that it takes a number of months for the credit bureaus to receive your financial information. It does not mean you cannot apply for a personal loan or line of credit. While a credit score is a very important factor in borrowing money, it is not the only factor.